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Gabriels Funeral Chapel Texas


Basic Details To Learn When Dealing With Jewish Traditions For Funeral

According to Jewish funeral traditions, the deceased should never be left unattended. A watchmen, or "Shomer" stays with the body from death until the funeral and burial. Usually the family will stay with the deceased as well. The first person to call upon a death is the rabbi, who will set the time of the funeral. Funerals are held in the synagogue or temple, however many modern Jewish families are opting for graveside services only.

Unlike other funeral traditions, it is a Jewish custom to not view the body after death; it is seen as disrespectful since the deceased cannot look back. For this reason, Jewish funerals are typically closed casket.

Embalming, a process used for sanitation and temporary preservation, is avoided unless it is required by local law. The sacred society, or the Chevra Kadisha usually take on the role of preparing the body. This is a group of pious Jewish followers who perform the Jewish Taharah, or purification.

The body is bathed and dressed in shrouds, called Tachrichim, which is the traditional burial garment. It is a simple garment with no pockets that symbolizes the fact that we take nothing with us when we leave this world and that we will be judged by God on our deeds and merits and not material possessions.

While families choose their own caskets, Jewish tradition calls for unadorned caskets made of wood that contain no metal. The family also decides on funeral details, but there are typically no floral arrangements as this is seen as unnecessary and frivolous.

The funeral typically takes between 20 and 30 minutes in which the rabbi with conduct a reading of the Psalms, other chosen Scripture readings, and a reading of the eulogy. Prior to or following the service, family and other mourners conduct the K'riah, or rendering of the garment, where they tear their clothes or place a black ribbon on their clothes. This shows others that they are in mourning for the deceased. These Jewish funeral traditions have been somewhat modified over time, but are generally followed by most Jews.


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